Research Fellow @ Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Resident Physician @ Mount Sinai Hospital

Neutralizing Antibody Responses in COVID-19 Convalescent Sera

William T Lee, Roxanne C Girardin, Alan P Dupuis, II, Karen E Kulas, Anne F Payne, Susan J Wong, Suzanne A. Arinsburg, Freddy T. Nguyen, Damodara Rao Mendu, Adolfo Firpo-Betancourt, Jeffrey S. Jhang, Ania Wajnberg, Florian Krammer, Carlos Cordon-Cardo, Sherlita Amler, Marisa Montecalvo, Brad Hutton, Jill Taylor, Kathleen A McDonough. The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2020-10-26

Full Text
Passive transfer of antibodies from COVID-19 convalescent patients is being used as an experimental treatment for eligible patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections. The United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) guidelines for convalescent plasma initially recommended target antibody titers of 160. We evaluated SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies in sera from recovered COVID-19 patients using plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) at moderate (PRNT50) and high (PRNT90) stringency thresholds. We found that neutralizing activity significantly increased with time post symptom onset (PSO), reaching a peak at 31–35 days PSO. At this point, the number of sera having neutralizing titers of at least 160 was approximately 93% (PRNT50) and approximately 54% (PRNT90). Sera with high SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels (>960 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers) showed maximal activity, but not all high-titer sera contained neutralizing antibody at FDA recommended levels, particularly at high stringency. These results underscore the value of serum characterization for neutralization activity.
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Physician-scientist with extensive experience developing and translating nanotechnologies and biomedical optical technologies from the bench to clinic in areas of genetics, oncology, and cardiovascular diseases. Extensive experience in community building in healthcare innovation, research, medical, and physician-scientist communities through various leadership roles.

Email: freddytn@mit.edu

Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow
Institute for Medical Engineering and Science

Research Fellow, MIT Innovation Initiative
Former Co-Director, MIT Hacking Medicine
Regional Director – Europe, MIT Hacking Medicine
Co-Director, MIT COVID-19 Challenge
Co-Director, MIT Hacking Racism Challenge

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139

Email: freddy.nguyen@mountsinai.org

Resident Physician, PGY-3,
Department of Pathology, Molecular and Cell-Based Medicine

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai Hospital
One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1194
New York, NY 10029